Google AdWords Campaigns

Campaign Limits
Currently, you can have up to 10,000 AdWords campaigns per account. A campaign is a set of ad groups which contain ads, keywords, and bids that share a budget, location targeting and other important settings. You can have 20,000 ad groups per campaign.

Creating your first AdWords campaign
Before we begin, you should understand that your first campaign does not have to be perfect. Work through the following steps and don’t overcomplicate your set up – the steps you’ll take after this are the nuts and bolts of your overall campaign, you can always go back and change these settings later.

    1. Write down a basic profile of your target audience. Consider their preferences, habits, traits, location, words/phrases they may use to search, the types of devices they use to browse the Internet.
    2. Click Create your first campaign (choose from the Search & Display Networks, Search Network only, or Display Network only – see image below). For now select “search network only”, we’ll get to “display network” in more detail later.
    3. New Campaign

    4. Choose a name for your campaign (we like to name by Keyword Match Type and main keyword). See the last section of this page for common AdWords campaign naming structures.
    5. Choose your settings for Device Targeting and Location Targeting.
    6. Device Targeting

    7. Select your Bidding and budget options (read more about Bid Management).

    Bidding Budget

    General AdWords Campaign Settings

    1. Locations: Location targeting allows you to select the geographical region where you want your ads to appear. Read more about Google location targeting.
    2. Languages: Choose the primary language your customers speak. For example, only customers whose Google interface language is French will see ads in campaigns targeted to French.
    3. Networks: Select the network on which you would your ads to appear. You can choose from the Google Search Network or the Google Display Network.
    4. Devices: This option allows you to choose which devices on which your ads will appear: mobile phones, desktops, or tablets. Read more about Device Targeting.
    5. Bidding option: You can choose either automatic or manual bidding for clicks on your ad. Other options allow you to pay per thousand impressions or set a cost-per-acquisition bid.
    6. Budget: You are able to change/adjust the daily budget of your campaign at any time. If your budget is set too low, you will not receive impression shares. Google will show you an error message letting you know that your campaign is limited by your budget.
    7. Delivery method: For campaigns with daily budgets that are lower than the budget necessary for the traffic in a given campaign, you can choose either standard or accelerated delivery for your daily budget. If you choose accelerated, Google will show your ads as quickly as possible for every available impression, and will stop showing your ads once your budget is reached. If you choose standard delivery, Google will show your ads gradually so you receive impression throughout the day.

    Advanced AdWords Campaign Settings

    1. Ad extensions: Ad extensions allow you to display more information about your business along with your ad text. Learn more about Ad Extensions
    2. Schedule (Start date, end date, ad scheduling): This feature allows you to specify certain times or days of the week when you want your ads to show. You may also adjust your bids for ads during certain time periods.
    3. Ad delivery (Ad rotation, frequency capping): Your ad rotation settings determine how often Google delivers your ads in relation to one another within an ad group.

    AdWords Campaign Segmentation
    Why segment your match types (keyword match types explained) into separate campaigns? In our experience, the average conversion rate will be higher for exact match keywords. The conversion rate is typically lower using Broad Match Modifier (BMM) and phrase match because they tend to generate irrelevant clicks. For example, if you were advertising cruises and used the phrase match keyword “Mexico Cruise,” your ad would also show for “Mexico cruise fire” (see image below). Also, because the conversion rate is higher with exact keywords, this will impact your bidding strategy (click to enlarge).

    Campaign Segmentation

    In this example, Google would show your ad for “Mexico cruise fire” if you’re using “Mexico cruise” as a phrase or BMM match type keyword. This is a problem because the user is probably searching for news and not a cruise, therefore lowering your conversion rate.

    Common AdWords Campaign Naming Structures

      Here is a good example of a typical campaign naming structure:

    • Non-Brand Exact: This campaign will contain only exact keywords that target new customers.
    • Non-Brand Phrase: This campaign will contain only phrase keywords that target new customers. You should also create a negative keyword list containing all of your exact keywords.
    • Non-Brand BMM: This campaign will contain only broad match modified (also known as BMM) keywords that target new customers. You should also create a negative keyword list containing all of your exact and phrase keywords.
    • Brand Exact: This campaign will contain only exact keywords that target returning customers.
    • Brand Phrase:This campaign will contain only phrase keywords that target returning customers. You should also create a negative keyword list containing all of your exact keywords.
    • Brand BMM: This campaign will contain only BMM keywords that target returning customers. You should also create a negative keyword list containing all of your exact and phrase keywords.
    • Non-Brand Automatic Display: This display campaign will automatically place banner and text ads on websites related to the keywords you have chosen.
    • Non-Brand Targeted Display: Once the automatic campaign is running, you will find sites that you feel are relevant to the goods or services you are offering. You will then create a placement for the exact website or webpage you would like to target with a banner ad or ad text.
    • Non-Brand Mobile: This campaign will target new mobile customers. You should separate your mobile campaigns from other campaigns because you will want to use a different URL (the mobile URL) than you would for other devices.
    • Brand Mobile: This campaign will target returning mobile customers. You should separate your mobile campaigns from other campaigns because you will want to use a different URL (the mobile URL) than you would for other devices.

    Google AdWords Ad Groups
    Next, you will learn about Google AdWords Ad Groups.